How can I have dizziness and balance problems but no neck pain?

I have been to see an Osteopath and receiving treatment for the last 11 weeks. Progress is slightly slower than he and I expected but he has found a really stubborn tight area around the C1 & C2 vertebrae and also across the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid and occipital muscles. Major symptoms have included loss of balance and proprioception along with dizziness. He has found accompanying tightness in my jaw - I have been dizzy when I chew food or drink too quickly - apparently my TMJ is tight and my neck is always very stiff first thing in the morning. I previously had an MRI scan which showed no vestibular malfunctioning although last year I had an episode of Vestibular Neuritis which kicked off my balance problems. I’ve been told that previously I was experiencing PPPD, although those symptoms seem to have eased. My current problems seem to be concerned with head and neck movements. My neck is sensitive to the touch. If I place a finger on the back of my neck around the C1 vertebrae, just lightly touching, it stimulates nausea and feelings of being “Not quite right”. Has anyone else experienced anything like this? My osteopath identified cervicogenic dizziness and text neck. For some reason though I don’t experience any neck pain but I can feel nauseous and imbalances. How can I have dizziness and balance problems but no neck pain?

Sorry to hear this! We cannot answer individual medical questions online due to everyone’s situations Amd bodies being unique, however we do have several videos on balance and dizziness that may help you. Here are the links in case your interested: Vestibular & Vertigo Symptoms? 10 Best Balance Exercises. - YouTube
Stop Vertigo/Dizziness at Home; Brandt Daroff Maneuver - YouTube

You should probably also make a pass by an ENT physician. I had severe vertigo that turned out to be Meniere’s disease (an inner ear problem). No “pain” involved at all.

PT definitely helped (see one that specializes in vertigo/balance issues…the ENT can probably refer you to one).